Archives for family

Need some support at school this year?

  

Seek advice from people with experience.

Other parents can provide ideas that could help guide you through the school system, even if their child’s issues are different than yours. Community and government organizations can provide contacts to parents and information about support services and educational policies. Some organizations you may wish to contact include:

  • BC Federation of Parent Advisory Councils 604-687-4433 www.bccpac.bc.ca   A non-profit organization that advocates for the best possible education for all children in BC, through the active involvement of parents.
  • Learning Disabilities Association 604-873-8139  www.ldabc.ca/
    Provides programs and services including tutoring, advocacy, and education about learning disabilities.
  • Family Support Institute 604-540-8374 www.familysupportbc.com
    Provides parent-to-parent support and advocacy for families of people with disabilities, as well as resources, information, and workshops.
  • BC Association for Community Living 604-777-9100 www.bcacl.org  For all individuals with developmental disabilities. Some nice resources and links to Transitions and Inclusive Education.
  • Community Living BC 604-664-0101 www.communitylivingbc.ca
    Delivers support and services to ELIGIBLE individuals with developmental disabilties and their families. This includes transition planning to adult service in partnership with the Ministry of Children and Family Development. Good FAQs on eligibility and programs and services for adults with developmental disabilities.
  • Ministry of Children and Family Development 250-952-6044 www.gov.bc.ca/mcf/
    Services include a range of child, youth, and family focused support programs and interventions to help promote.  All are eligibility tested.
  • Federation of Independent School Associations 604-684-6023 www.fisabc.ca
    An umbrella organization for independent schools in BC. Acts as a liaison between the schools, government, and other educational institutions.

Make a Family Tradition!

  

Create Memories, not anxieties!

Back-to-school is an anxious time for children AND parents. Try to make the whole experience something to remember with fondness by making up your own family tradition for the first day of school.

Many families take a yearly photograph on the first day of school.  From year to year you can compare how big they have grown!  And not just their backpacks!

Some families have a special event when the kids get home.  Go out for lunch or have a B-B-Q.  Take the time to find out who is in your child’s class this year and "Oh, my goodness, you have which teacher?  Yikes, didn’t your father have her for grade 3? She must be ready for retirement by now!"  

Make a Back-to-School advent calendar of activities.  Do something special every day for the week prior to back-to-school.  This might include re-jigging sleep schedules.  My kids always stay up later and get up later as summer goes by.  If it is part of their special back-to-school activities they might forgive you for the early bedtimes.

Some parents write a letter or a note on the first day of school, which their child can read during a free moment at school. Your letter might offer encouragement or point out specific things your child did that made you proud.

Disneyland: Go to the front of the line!

  

You may be able to "bypass" lines at Disneyland when you are accompanying a person with a disability.  Every disability has different rules and they may be very different from when you last visited the Magic Kingdom ten years ago. 

Check out: Disneyland Guest Services California

DisneyWorld Guest Services Florida

so that you know what to expect when you travel to Disneyland.