Health & Wellness

Summer Camps, Summer Activities

  

BACI Summer Teen Program

The Burnaby Association for Community Inclusion runs a Summer Teen Program. Email info@gobaci.com for more details.

The Summer Teen Program offers cool, full-day adventures for youth with disabilities. The program is a Ministry of Children and Family Development funded service for Teens aged 13 to 18 who live in Burnaby and New Westminster.  Please see THE FLYER from 2012 for more information.

Day Camps:

The first place to look is your local Parks and Recreation department.  Every City and Municipality in the lower mainland has both segregated and inclusive programs for children with special needs.  Don’t forget that you can choose to have your child
included in typical summer programs with either paid or volunteer support people.  Including your child in a typical program will give you much more flexibility than restricting yourself to only segregated or specialized programs.  If your child is already happy in an arts, sports or recreation program in your community check out the summer camp options for that program as soon as possible.  Summer camps fill up fast!

Think about using a camp near where you work rather than where you live.  It might be easier to drop off and pick up en-route to your workplace.  Cities and Municipalities have their recreation programs on-line so it is much easier to research your options.

Burnaby:   Visit the CHILDREN’S CAMPS page for information on policies for  support and accessibility as well as the Activity Guide.  Also see the  Leisure Guide for all spring/summer programs.

Vancouver:    Visit the ACCESS PROGRAMS page for policies and programs.  This page also links to children/youth and adult programs – see links on left side of page

Tri-Cities & New Westminster:  Summer recreation program information and support options will be available in late May.

Overnight Camps: 

The big daddy of overnight camps is EASTER SEALS CAMPSThey have been around a long time and are well resourced with well-trained staff.  There are only a few weeks available since each “week” is specialized in age and disability.  You can request that your child shares a room with the friends they made the year before and many children make life-long friends at summer camp.  The big draw for Easter Seals is that it is FREE.

ZAJAC RANCH
is a high quality overnight camp.  Weeks are sponsored by organizations
or there are weeks targeting specific disabilities.  This camp can be
expensive but don’t forget that many disability organizations have
campership programs to help finance your child’s camp experience.

HINT:  Make
sure you join the organization that represents your child’s disability
in British Columbia.  You may find that they sponsor disability-specific
camps or offer camperships to families to help finance a camp
experience.

Links to some Resource sites:

 The BC Camping Association (BCCCA):  This is a site for accredited summer day and overnight camps with a good search engine.  BC CAMPING ASSOCIATION

 Autism Community Training (ACT):  Some good camp listings for both typical children and children with special needs, see   SUMMER CAMP RESOURCES  

 Vancouver Parks and Recreation:  Access Services RESOURCES AND LINKS

What do medication expiry dates mean?

  

This research was done in the US, but we know that most of Canada’s medical regulations follow the US model.  The article is reprinted at Medscape, a reliable US medical website but the original location of the post (redflagsdaily.com) is no longer available.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/460159

 

By Richard Altschuler

Does the expiration date on a bottle of a medication mean anything? If a bottle of Tylenol, for example, says something like “Do not use after June 1998,” and it is August 2002, should you take the Tylenol? Should you discard it? Can you get hurt if you take it? Will it simply have lost its potency and do you no good?

In other words, are drug manufacturers being honest with us when they put an expiration date on their medications, or is the practice of dating just another drug industry scam, to get us to buy new medications when the old ones that purportedly have “expired” are still perfectly good?

These are the pressing questions I investigated after my mother-in-law recently said to me, “It doesn’t mean anything,” when I pointed out that the Tylenol she was about to take had “expired” 4 years and a few months ago. I was a bit mocking in my pronouncement — feeling superior that I had noticed the chemical corpse in her cabinet — but she was equally adamant in her reply, and is generally very sage about medical issues.

So I gave her a glass of water with the purportedly “dead” drug, of which she took 2 capsules for a pain in the upper back. About a half hour later she reported the pain seemed to have eased up a bit. I said “You could be having a placebo effect,” not wanting to simply concede she was right about the drug, and also not actually knowing what I was talking about. I was just happy to hear that her pain had eased, even before we had our evening cocktails and hot tub dip (we were in “Leisure World,” near  Laguna Beach ,  California , where the hot tub is bigger than most  Manhattan apartments, and “Heaven,” as generally portrayed, would be raucous by comparison).

Upon my return to NYC and high-speed connection, I immediately scoured the medical databases and general literature for the answer to my question about drug expiration labeling. And voila, no sooner than I could say “Screwed again by the pharmaceutical industry,” I had my answer. Here are the simple facts:

First, the expiration date, required by law in the United States, beginning in 1979, specifies only the date the manufacturer guarantees the full potency and safety of the drug — it does not mean how long the drug is actually “good” or safe to use.
Second, medical authorities uniformly say it is safe to take drugs past their expiration date — no matter how “expired” the drugs purportedly are. Except for possibly the rarest of exceptions, you won’t get hurt and you certainly won’t get killed.
Studies show that expired drugs may lose some of their potency over time, from as little as 5% or less to 50% or more (though usually much less than the latter). Even 10 years after the “expiration date,” most drugs have a good deal of their original potency. So wisdom dictates that if your life does depend on an expired drug, and you must have 100% or so of its original strength, you should probably toss it and get a refill.  If your life does not depend on an expired drug — such as that for headache, hay fever, or menstrual cramps — take it and see what happens.

One of the largest studies ever conducted that supports the above points about “expired drug” labeling was done by the US military 15 years ago, according to a feature story in the Wall Street Journal (March 29, 2000), reported by Laurie P. Cohen. The military was sitting on a $1 billion stockpile of drugs and facing the daunting process of destroying and replacing its supply every 2 to 3 years, so it began a testing program to see if it could extend the life of its inventory. The testing, conducted by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), ultimately covered more than 100 drugs, prescription and over-the-counter. The results showed that about 90% of them were safe and effective as far as 15 years past their original expiration date.
In light of these results, a former director of the testing program, Francis Flaherty, said he concluded that expiration dates put on by manufacturers typically have no bearing on whether a drug is usable for longer. Mr. Flaherty noted that a drug maker is required to prove only that a drug is still good on whatever expiration date the company chooses to set. The expiration date doesn’t mean, or even suggest, that the drug will stop being effective after that, nor that it will become harmful. “Manufacturers put expiration dates on for marketing, rather than scientific, reasons,” said Mr. Flaherty, a pharmacist at the FDA until his retirement in 1999. “It’s not profitable for them to have products on a shelf for 10 years. They want turnover.”

The FDA cautioned there isn’t enough evidence from the program, which is weighted toward drugs used during combat, to conclude most drugs in consumers’ medicine cabinets are potent beyond the expiration date. Joel Davis, however, a former FDA expiration-date compliance chief, said that with a handful of exceptions — notably nitroglycerin, insulin, and some liquid antibiotics — most drugs are probably as durable as those the agency has tested for the military. “Most drugs degrade very slowly,” he said. “In all likelihood, you can take a product you have at home and keep it for many years. ” Consider aspirin. Bayer AG puts 2-year or 3-year dates on aspirin and says that it should be discarded after that. However, Chris Allen, a vice president at the Bayer unit that makes aspirin, said the dating is “pretty conservative” ; when Bayer has tested 4-year-old aspirin, it remained 100% effective, he said. So why doesn’t Bayer set a 4-year expiration date? Because the company often changes packaging, and it undertakes “continuous improvement programs,” Mr. Allen said. Each change triggers a need for more expiration-date testing, and testing each time for a 4-year life would be impractical. Bayer has never tested aspirin beyond 4 years, Mr. Allen said. But Jens Carstensen has. Dr. Carstensen, professor emeritus at the  University of  Wisconsin ‘s pharmacy school, who wrote what is considered the main text on drug stability, said, “I did a study of different aspirins, and after 5 years, Bayer was still excellent. Aspirin, if made correctly, is very stable.

Okay, I concede. My mother-in-law was right, once again. And I was wrong, once again, and with a wiseacre attitude to boot. Sorry mom.

Now I think I’ll take a swig of the 10-year dead package of Alka Seltzer in my medicine chest — to ease the nausea I’m feeling from calculating how many billions of dollars the pharmaceutical industry bilks out of unknowing consumers every year who discard perfectly good drugs and buy new ones because they trust the industry’s “expiration date labeling.”

Need help with shoveling snow? Find a Snow angels program

  

Need help clearing the snow?  Burnaby has a SNOW ANGELS program,  Or would you like to be a snow angel for your neighbors?  You can register at the Burnaby SNOW ANGELS site.


You can also find Snow Angel programs in other municipalities by just Googling Snow Angel and your city name.

Trouble navigating the disability system?

  

Our Disability Benefits Navigator allows you to quickly find what you might be missing: http://www.abilitytax.ca/navigator/home.html

 

 

 

 

Burnaby Village Museum Free in 2012

  

(Updated June 2012)  For 2012, the Burnaby Village Museum & Carousel is celebrating both
the carousel’s and the interurban tram’s 100th year.To celebrate, the
City of Burnaby invites all to enjoy free gate admission. Carousel rides
are only $2.30 per ride for all ages.

Visit the website for hours: http://www.burnabyvillagemuseum.ca/

 

Top Ten Farmer’s Markets

  

Ambleside Farmers’ Market
Bellevue St &13th St
West Vancouver, British Columbia, V7T 2H2
Phone:(604) 628-8226
Website:  www.artisanmarkets.ca
Sundays from May 01, 2011 – Sunday October 30, 2011
Accepted payment methods: Cash
How to Get Here: The parking lot behind the police station on Bellevue St, between 13th & 14th St in Ambleside,
West Vancouver.



Baker’s Market

7646 Prince Albert St
Vancouver, British Columbia, V5X 3Z4
Phone:(604) 899-7993
Website: www.bakersmarket.com
Saturdays frin October 01, 2011 – Saturday December 10, 2011
Accepted payment methods: Cash
How to Get Here: Take Fraser St bus south, get off at E 60th, cross the road, walk 2 blocks east to Moberly Arts


 

Burnaby Farmers’ Market
4949 Canada Way
Burnaby, British Columbia
V5G 1M2
Phone: (604) 628-8226
Website:  www.artisanmarkets.ca
Tuesday June 07, 2011 – Saturday October 29, 2011
Accepted payment methods: Cash

This season we are very excited to be moving to the Carousel Meadow at Burnaby Village Museum at 6501 Deer Lake Avenue.
The Village has free entrance this year and there is so much to see,
and enjoy, at the village once you have finished your shopping at the
market. There is Free Parking opposite Entrance 6 and it is just a
short walk to the market from that Gate.


 

Dundarave Farmers’ Market
Dundarave Village
North Vancouver, British Columbia,V6C 3A8
Phone: (604) 987-4488
Website: www.dundaravevillage.ca
Saturday April 30, 2011 – Saturday September 24, 2011
Accepted payment methods: Cash


 

East Vancouver Farmers’ Market
Trout Lake Community Centre Parking Lot
Vancouver, British Columbia
Phone: 604-879-FARM
Website:  www.bcfarmersmarket.orgV6K 1H9
Sunday May 08, 2011 – Sunday October 23, 2011
Accepted payment methods: Cash
How to Get Here: East 15th and Victoria Dr in the parking lot of the Trout Lake Community Centre.


 

Kitsilano Farmers’ Market
Kitsilano Community Centre Parking Lot
Vancouver, British Columbia
V6K 4K9
Phone:  604-879-FARM
Website:  www.eatlocal.org
Saturday May 22, 2010 – Sunday October 23, 2011
Accepted payment methods: Cash


 

Lonsdale Quay Farmers’ Market
123 Carrie Cates Crt
North Vancouver, British Columbia
V7G 1P8
Phone:  (604) 628-8226
Website:  www.lonsdalequay.com
Saturday May 07, 2011 – Saturday October 29, 2011
Accepted payment methods: Cash
How to Get Here: On the East Plaza at Lonsdale Quay & Shops, 123 Carrie Cates Crt, at the foot of Lonsdale, North Vancouver.


 

Main Street Station Farmers’ Market
Thornton Park (Main & Terminal)
Vancouver, British Columbia, V5T 3J5
Phone:604-879-FARM
Website: www.eatlocal.org
Wednesday June 01, 2011 – Wednesday October 05, 2011
Accepted payment methods: Cash
How to Get Here: Located at Main & Terminal Ave in front of Pacific Central Terminal Station.


 

Trout Lake Farmers Market
Parking Lot Of Trout Lake Community Centre
Vancouver, British Columbia,V5N 4M4
Phone:(604) 879-3276
Website:  www.eatlocal.org
Saturday May 14, 2011 – Saturday October 22, 2011
Accepted payment methods: Cash


Local Parks & Rec Links

  

Your local parks and recreation department will have many opportunities for children with special needs to experience inclusive recreational activities as well as some specialized programs. You might be surprised! Make sure to check out YOUR local parks and rec web-site.

Burnaby:   Please visit  the BURNABY LEISURE GUIDE, Fall Winter 2011/12 pages 8 & 9 for a listing of all the adapted programs.


Vancouver:  Please see THE VANCOUVER PARKS WEBSITE adapted programs for all ages.

New Westminster:  New West does not have segregated programs.  Please contact the program or site directly if you have a special access request.  Please see the GENERAL SITE.

Summer Internet Safety for parents

  

(updated June 2012)

You just know the kids will spend way too much time on-line over the summer, but do you know some of the things you should be aware of to help keep them safe?

I have found a few places to help you think about what you and your family’s needs really are and perhaps help you to start a conversation with your child about how they use the internet.

Internet Safety Advice from another parent:

Geek Dad on Wired.com The Geek Dad blog is "raising the geek generation 2.0".  You will find reviews of filtering software and security products as well as the common-sense advice parents can really use.  The guys also really like cool toys and new apps so there is lots to have fun with here too.  See the post:  5 Steps to a Family-Safe Internet

Internet safety advice from an organization specializing in the family and parenting:

Common Sense International: you will find basic information about all the various types of communication on the internet from on-line gaming to email to social networking sites.  What are they, and how do they work, as well as some safety tips for families. 

What parents need to know about Cyberbullying:

Define the Line:   Clarifying the Blurred Lines between Cyber-bullying and Socially Responsible Digital Citizenship. This thought-provoking Canadian site explains the issue in plain language and includes some video vignettes for both adults and youth.  This is not a “how to deal with cyber-bullying” website because there are no
quick fixes but this website can help you make informed choices.

Have an opinion about BC Children’s Hospital? Get involved!

  
Volunteer in Your Pajamas!  Become a Part of Our Virtual Focus Group!
  • Email communication only.
  • Projects take no longer than 5 – 10 minutes.
  • Contribute at your leisure – day or night.
  • Only choose projects you want to participate in.
  • All comments and identity will be anonymous (unless you give permission to use your information) when we share the results of our surveys with various departments / administration.
  • Withdraw from the group at any time.
  • Be confident that your child’s care will not be affected by your participation in or withdrawal from our group.
Why Should I Join?
  • Help the Partners in Care Family Advisory to give a broad family perspective of hospital issues and initiatives.
  • Help the Partners in Care Family Advisory effect change with regard to hospital programs and decisions made by hospital administration.
  • Gain satisfaction in knowing by your family voice you can make a difference in the services that BCCH provides.
  • Have the joy of "giving back".
  • Know that you’re helping make the hospital a better place for other families.
  • Please join us as a Virtual Focus Group Member and use your experience to benefit all patients and families who use BC Children’s Hospital!
For more information about Partners in Care and about your role as a Virtual Focus Group Family Member please contact the Partners in Care Family Liaison:
Susan Greig 
BC Children’s Hospital
Room 3D19, 4480 Oak Street
Vancouver, BC  V6H 3V4
Phone:  604-875-2345  Ext. 5391 
Email: sgreig@cw.bc.ca
See also the Partners in Care (PiC) blogsite at:

New Spasticity Clinic

  

Contact Dr. Heather Finlayson to get information about this new spasticity clinic at G.F. Strong that just opened up for people who have severe spasticity in their limbs.  It is for adults and it is covered under their medical plan.  There is a team of doctors and therapists that will assist and evaluate you.  Also, the suppliers of Botox have given them a large grant for this two year project.