Care-giving

HAFI Grants – Home Adaptatons for Independence

  

Government of BC program that recognizes even small home adaptations can make a big difference in the

lives of people who wish to remain in their homes longer.

If you or a member of your family is having difficulty performing day-to-day activities independently and safely – the HAFI program may be able to help. 
Note that to be eligible for grants to make an improvement your house must be worth less than lot value – who sets these ridiculous limits anyways?

http://www.bchousing.org/Options/Home_Renovations

Need some support at school this year?

  

Seek advice from people with experience.

Other parents can provide ideas that could help guide you through the school system, even if their child’s issues are different than yours. Community and government organizations can provide contacts to parents and information about support services and educational policies. Some organizations you may wish to contact include:

  • BC Federation of Parent Advisory Councils 604-687-4433 www.bccpac.bc.ca   A non-profit organization that advocates for the best possible education for all children in BC, through the active involvement of parents.
  • Learning Disabilities Association 604-873-8139  www.ldabc.ca/
    Provides programs and services including tutoring, advocacy, and education about learning disabilities.
  • Family Support Institute 604-540-8374 www.familysupportbc.com
    Provides parent-to-parent support and advocacy for families of people with disabilities, as well as resources, information, and workshops.
  • BC Association for Community Living 604-777-9100 www.bcacl.org  For all individuals with developmental disabilities. Some nice resources and links to Transitions and Inclusive Education.
  • Community Living BC 604-664-0101 www.communitylivingbc.ca
    Delivers support and services to ELIGIBLE individuals with developmental disabilties and their families. This includes transition planning to adult service in partnership with the Ministry of Children and Family Development. Good FAQs on eligibility and programs and services for adults with developmental disabilities.
  • Ministry of Children and Family Development 250-952-6044 www.gov.bc.ca/mcf/
    Services include a range of child, youth, and family focused support programs and interventions to help promote.  All are eligibility tested.
  • Federation of Independent School Associations 604-684-6023 www.fisabc.ca
    An umbrella organization for independent schools in BC. Acts as a liaison between the schools, government, and other educational institutions.

Trouble navigating the disability system?

  

Our Disability Benefits Navigator allows you to quickly find what you might be missing: http://www.abilitytax.ca/navigator/home.html

 

 

 

 

Have an opinion about BC Children’s Hospital? Get involved!

  
Volunteer in Your Pajamas!  Become a Part of Our Virtual Focus Group!
  • Email communication only.
  • Projects take no longer than 5 – 10 minutes.
  • Contribute at your leisure – day or night.
  • Only choose projects you want to participate in.
  • All comments and identity will be anonymous (unless you give permission to use your information) when we share the results of our surveys with various departments / administration.
  • Withdraw from the group at any time.
  • Be confident that your child’s care will not be affected by your participation in or withdrawal from our group.
Why Should I Join?
  • Help the Partners in Care Family Advisory to give a broad family perspective of hospital issues and initiatives.
  • Help the Partners in Care Family Advisory effect change with regard to hospital programs and decisions made by hospital administration.
  • Gain satisfaction in knowing by your family voice you can make a difference in the services that BCCH provides.
  • Have the joy of "giving back".
  • Know that you’re helping make the hospital a better place for other families.
  • Please join us as a Virtual Focus Group Member and use your experience to benefit all patients and families who use BC Children’s Hospital!
For more information about Partners in Care and about your role as a Virtual Focus Group Family Member please contact the Partners in Care Family Liaison:
Susan Greig 
BC Children’s Hospital
Room 3D19, 4480 Oak Street
Vancouver, BC  V6H 3V4
Phone:  604-875-2345  Ext. 5391 
Email: sgreig@cw.bc.ca
See also the Partners in Care (PiC) blogsite at:

What do do when someone has a seizure

  

During a Convulsion
A person falls, their body becomes rigid, muscles jerk, and breathing may become shallow.
What should you do?
• Stay calm. Most seizures last less than five minutes.
• Do not restrain the person during the seizure.
• Protect the person from injury. If possible, ease the person to the floor. Move hazardous objects out
of their way.
• As soon as possible, gently roll the person onto their side.
• Loosen anything around their neck and remove their eyeglasses.
• Check for medical identification: a medical bracelet or necklace.
• Do not put anything in their mouth. A person cannot swallow their tongue.
• Afterwards, talk gently to comfort and reassure the person. Stay with them until they are re-oriented.

Other Seizures
Not all seizures are convulsive. A person may stare blankly, and appear dazed and unresponsive. They may walk in a purposeless and clumsy manner. These seizures usually last less than five minutes.

What should you do?
• Stay with the person. The person may be unaware of their actions.
• Move hazardous objects out of their way.
• Do not restrain the person during their seizure.
• Gently guide the person away from any danger.
• Afterwards, talk gently to reassure the person. Stay with them until they are re-oriented.

When should you call 911?
• When a seizure lasts longer than five minutes.
• When you find someone in a convulsion and you are unsure how long the seizure has lasted.
• When seizures repeat without full recovery between them.
• If the person appears confused for more than 20 minutes after a seizure.
• When a seizure has occurred in water.
• If the person is injured, pregnant, or has diabetes.

For more information, please contact the BC Epilepsy Society at
604-875-6704, info@bcepilepsy.com, or www.bcepilepsy.com.
First Aid for Seizures

BEDBUGS! What are they and what to do!

  

Bedbugs were once a common public health pest worldwide, which declined in incidence through the mid 20th century. Recently however, bed bugs have undergone a dramatic resurgence and worldwide there are reports of increasing numbers of infestations. Bed bugs are one of the great travelers of the world and are readily transported via luggage, clothing, bedding and furniture. As such, they have a worldwide distribution.

Some Basic Facts:
Bed bugs are persistent. Eradicating, exterminating or just killing an entire infestation requires persistence.
Bed bugs can hide in extremely small cracks and crevices making it difficult to locate breeding sites.
Bedbugs are rarely seen in daylight. They emerge from their hiding spots at night.
Bed bugs can live a year or longer without food (blood) and thus stay in their hiding places.
Bed bugs can travel long distances and survive in suitcases, clothing, vehicles, aircraft, cruise ships and other modes of transportation.
Bed bug females lay about 300 eggs.
Bed bugs hatch from eggs in 10 days.

Bed Bug Bites:
Bed bugs feed by piercing skin with an elongated beak. Saliva is injected, containing an anesthetic to reduce pain, and an anticoagulant to keep blood flowing. The reaction to bed bug bites varies among individuals, from no reaction to sever skin inflammation and irritation.

How to treat bites:
The redness and itch associated with bedbug bites usually goes away on its own within a week or two. You might speed your recovery by using:
A skin cream containing hydrocortisone
An oral antihistamine, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
If you develop a skin infection from scratching bedbug bites, your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic.

Treating your home:
Once your symptoms are treated, you must tackle the underlying infestation. This can be difficult because bedbugs hide so well and can live for months without eating. Your best bet may be to hire a professional exterminator, who may use a combination of pesticides and nonchemical treatments.
Nonchemical treatments may include:
Vacuuming. A thorough vacuuming of cracks and crevices can physically remove bedbugs from an area. But vacuum cleaners can’t reach all hiding places.
Hot water. Washing clothes and other items in water at least 120 F (49 C) can kill bedbugs.
Clothes dryer. Placing wet or dry items in a clothes dryer set at medium to high heat for 20 minutes will kill bedbugs and their eggs.
Enclosed vehicle. If it’s summer, you can bag up infested items and leave them in a car parked in the sun with the windows rolled up for a day. The target temperature is at least 120 F (49 C).
Freezing. Bedbugs are also vulnerable to temperatures below 32 F (0 C) but you’d need to leave the items outdoors or in the freezer for several days.
Some professional exterminators use portable devices to produce steam, heat or freezing temperatures to kill bedbugs. In some cases, you may have to throw out heavily infested items such as mattresses or couches.

MORE RESOURCES & INFORMATION

BC Tenant Resource and Advisory Centre, Tips on Bedbugs:

http://www.tenants.bc.ca/main/?bedbugs 

Vancouver Coastal Health: 

http://www.vch.ca/your_environment/pest_management/bed_bugs/bed_bugs

North American Bed Bug Registry:

http://bedbugregistry.com/ 

GLOBAL National August 12,2010: 

http://www.globalnational.com/story.html?id=1382550

 

 

Summer Camp fun!

  

There are many possibilities for children of all abilities to enjoy summer camp.  The best-known one is the Easter Seals Summer Camp, but there are many more options for both day and overnight camp opportunities. 

ACT BC‘s Summer Camp List is one of the most comprehensive for children with special needs. 

Also find complete listings of  BCCA accredited camps at the BC Camping Association website.  They have a good list of hints and tips, including this one, "…the people who direct the camp are far more important than the equipment, buildings, and facilities advertised."

Many Disability-centred non-profits also sponsor summer camps for children with specific disabilities.  Check out the organization that supports your child’s disability and see what they may be offering this year.  For example the Cerebral Palsy Association of BC offers funding for children with CP to attend camp and the Canadian Cancer Society has Camp Goodtimes for children and teens living with cancer.

Travelling by bus in BC and Canada?

  

Pacific Coach Lines (travel between Victoria, Vancouver and Whistler) has a limited number of wheelchair lift equipped coaches in its fleet. For passengers who require service with the wheelchair lift equipped coach reservations must be made AT LEAST 48 hours in advance of the trip to guarantee accessible service. For Health and Safety reasons motorized scooters cannot be loaded, unloaded or securely fastened within the baggage bays.

For passengers who use mobility aids but are able to board the coach with some assistance and store their mobility aid under the coach, phone Pacific Coach Lines at least 24 hours before departure to request assistance and be at the depot no less than 30 minutes prior to departure for boarding.

For more detailed information on these services, please contact customer service:

1-800-661-1725 (toll free) or 604-662-7575

 

GREYHOUND BUS LINES  (travel across BC, Canada and the US) allows some people with disabilities and their attendant to ride together for the price of one ticket. This applies only on regular fares, not specials. Most depots have accessible washroom facilities and attendants to assist people in wheelchairs.
Check Greyhound’s web site for current policy as each type of disability (hearing, mobility etc) have diffent eligibility requirements and accomodations.

Greyhound suggests you call their information line to check on the current rules.
Fare and schedule information in Canada
1-800-661-TRIP (8747)

TDD/TTY
1-800-397-7870 5:00 a.m. – Midnight

Resources for Parenting Younger Children

  

Attachment Parenting Canada

This website provides parents with evidence-based information regarding how to best deal with their children

http://www.attachmentparenting.ca/

Unfortunately, the BC chapter does not currently have any contact persons on its website.

 

BC Family Resource Programs

106-2590 Granville St, Vancouver, BC, V6H 3H1

Phone: (604) 738-0068, Fax: (604) 738-0058

This website introduces you to community based family resource programs. It mainly seeks to strengthen and empower families within their communities. It aims to help families offer children the best for optimal development.

http://www.frpbc.ca/

 

Children First

This is a website that aims at helping BC families with small children through a number of initiatives. Although it does not provide direct services, it can help families get services that are identified by community planning.

http://www.bcchildrenfirst.ca/

 

Empathic Parenting

This is a Canadian-based website that provides information and advice on how to best parent your child. It also offers a FREE online parenting course and has links to other useful websites.

http://www.empathicparenting.org/index.html

 

Fussy Baby

This website is quite useful to any parent of a small child. It contains information about fussy babies and offers useful tips to parents as to how they can handle their fussy baby. This website has a discussion forum for parents and others who deal with fussy babies. It also connects you to other websites that might be of use to you.

www.fussybaby.ca

 

The Natural Child Project

This is a great website for any parent. It offers a lot of advice and information about raising healthy children

http://www.naturalchild.com/

Cuts to Medical Coverage = fewer dentist visits

  

Cuts to Medical Coverage and Minimum Shelter Allowance

FromBC Coaltion for People with Disabilities

Following the March 2nd budget, the Ministry of Housing and Social Development announced it will be making a number of cuts to the health and medical services available to people receiving provincial disabilitybenefits and income assistance. The BC Coalition of People with Disabilities (BCCPD) is very concerned about the impact that these changes will have on our community.

We are also disappointed at the lack of community consultation about these cuts. If you share our concerns, we invite you to write to Minister Coleman and your MLA. You can find your local MLA and Minister Coleman’s contact information by going to http://www.leg.bc.ca/Mla/3-1-1.htm.

The BCCPD is currently reviewing the new regulations in order to provide you with detailed information on the changes. In the meantime, here is a very brief list of some of the changes which will come into force on April 1st (unless we have indicated a different date).

Medical Equipment and Supplies

A broad range of medical equipment and supplies will no longer be funded by the Ministry. Those that will be funded must be the cheapest appropriate to the person’s needs and are listed in the regulations. Here are some examples of items that the Ministry will no longer fund:

  • diagnostic testing devices such as glucose meters
  • contraceptive devices (for example, IUDs)
  • pre-made orthotics.

Restrictions

In addition to changes to what the Ministry will fund, there will be restrictions, for example on:

  • how often the Ministry will repair or replace equipment
  • how much money the Ministry will spend on each item of equipment. For instance, motorized scooters valued at more than $3,500 will not be funded. To be eligible for a motorized scooter, a physician must say the applicant won’t need a wheelchair for 5 years.

Monthly Nutritional Supplement (MNS)

The eligibility requirements for the MNS have been tightened. For example:

  • loss of bone density will no longer count as a symptom
  • significant weight loss not significant weight change will be used to determine eligibility.
  • applicants will be required to demonstrate they have at least two symptoms, rather than one which is currently the case.

The MNS will be reduced by $20 because the Ministry will no longer fund bottled water. People currently receiving the bottled water supplement will receive it until May 31st 2010 only.

Medical Services: Time limits and Income-Testing

  • People with disabilities who leave assistance when they turn 65 and go on to the seniors’ pension, or people who leave provincial disability for Canada Pension Plan Disability will only keep their medical and dental coverage for one year, rather than permanently as is currently the case.
  • People with disabilities who leave assistance for employment will only keep their medical coverage if they are receiving Premium Assistance from the Medical Services Plan.

Dental Treatment

  • Cleaning, examinations and fluoride treatments will be reduced to once a year (currently twice a year).
  • X-ray coverage every 2 years (currently every year).

Shelter Allowance

The $75 monthly Shelter Allowance for people who don’t pay rent is eliminated as of June 1st 2010.